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Utah

Total Correctional Population: 25,400

Number on Parole or Probation: 15,900

Number in Local Jail or Prison: 11,700

Incarceration Rate per 100,000 residents: 380

Incarceration Rate Rank: 43rd

Corrections Share of 2018 General Fund Expenditures: 6.0%

Sources: 

“Correctional Populations in the United States, 2016,” U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 

"2018 State Expenditure Report," National Association of State Budget Officers 

recently enacted reforms

2019

House Bill 431: Allows for automatic expungement of charges for which an individual is acquitted, charges that are dismissed with prejudice, and misdemeanor convictions after a certain number of years; requires the court to actively identify records eligible for automatic expungement and facilitate the process.

House Bill 318: Provides that the least restrictive restraints are to be used on a pregnant inmate; requires that a correctional staff member individually review an inmate's situation before allowing restraints to be used on an inmate during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery; and prohibits the use of shackles or other restraints during labor and delivery.

NEWS

May 24, 2019

“The full impact of H.B. 239 will take years to materialize as new policies and practices are phased in across the state. Still, in the initial years after the launch of system improvements, early signs indicate progress.”

An issue brief from the Pew Charitable Trusts found that Utah’s Juvenile Justice Reforms have already produced positive outcomes, including a 23% decline in youth entering the juvenile justice system between fiscal years 2016 and 2018. In that same time period, court referrals that lead to nonjudicial adjustments reached 55% of all referrals, an increase of 224%. Detention admissions declined by 44%, allowing the Juvenile Justice Services to close units at the Salt Lake Valley Detention Center and Slate Canyon Youth Center.

April 26, 2019

“There is more work to be done, but this is a great sign that we are on the right path.”

New numbers from the Bureau of Justice Statistics showed a continued decline in prison populations, down to 1.49 million from a peak in 2009 of 1.62 million. Five states—New York, New Jersey, Alaska, Connecticut and Vermont—have reduced their prison population by at least 30% in the past twenty years. Not all states have seen declines—Kentucky’s state inmate population increased by 2.3% between 2016 and 2017, and Utah saw an increase of 4.3% in that time frame.

April 12, 2019

“The benefits of Clean Slate are clear: lower crime rates, taxpayer money saved as a result of reduced incarceration, and a stronger economy that allows more qualified job seekers to participate.”

Writing in the Hartford Courant, Right on Crime’s Marc Levin and the Center for American Progress’s Rebecca Vallas urged Connecticut lawmakers to pass the Clean Slate Act pending in the legislature. The Clean Slate Act would provide for the automatic expungement of criminal records for those who have completed their sentence and remained crime free for five years after a non-violent felony, or three years after a misdemeanor. Clean Slate laws have gained traction across the country—Pennsylvania and Utah both passed automatic expungement laws, and Kentucky and New Mexico expanded opportunities for expungement this year.

March 15, 2019

“If you do everything you’re asked to do, and jump through all the hoops, there ought to be a mechanism that allows you to get your life back on track.”

With unanimous votes in both the House and Senate, Utah legislators passed House Bill 431, The Expungement Act of 2019. The bill would allow for automatic expungement of certain criminal records after a set period of five to seven years, depending on the offense. H.B. 431 is expected to be signed by Governor Gary Herbert, making Utah the second state in the country to pass automatic expungement legislation.  “When we equip individuals with the tools they need to turn their lives around,” argued former U.S. Attorney and Utahn Brett Tolman, “we are smarter and safer as a state and a country.”

December 14, 2018

“That actually has potential to open up additional funding for people who are incarcerated or leaving jails or getting continued treatment once they leave prisons.”

Reforms intended to keep nonviolent offenders out of Utah’s prisons have led to a 12% drop in prison population, but shifted many people with addiction into county jails that currently lack drug-treatment programs. A new report from the Utah Foundation examined the state’s treatment and rehabilitation programs, and found significant savings to taxpayers in the long term, but underscored the need to expand access to pre-booking diversion and treatment programs in county jails.

November 16, 2018

“When veterans court says this is a second chance for veterans to be successful in life, we really mean it.”
 
Salt Lake City’s veterans court, now in its third year, allows servicemen and women to have their convictions cleared or reduced after successfully completing a program tailored to their needs and experiences. Participants meet with judges and case managers, complete recommended mental health or addiction treatment programs, and are matched with mentors who also served in the military. Most of the program’s participants served in Iraq and Afghanistan.  

October 5, 2018

“A growing body of evidence demonstrates that incarceration is an ineffective response to drug abuse and that treatment in the community produces better public safety results.”

A new report from the Urban Institute looks at five states that have reclassified drug possession from a felony to a misdemeanor and makes recommendations for other states looking toward reform. Utah’s prison population has declined 9% since HB 348 was enacted, driven in part by a 74% drop in new commitments for drug possession. The number of people in prison for drug possession in Connecticut has declined by 74%, and the Department of Corrections projects cost savings of $9.8 million in fiscal 2017. In addition to reclassification, the report recommends investment in substance abuse treatment and behavioral health programs.

September 21, 2018

“I am excited about the people who have gone through it, that are staying clean and sober, that are not resorting to crime.”

Cache Achieve, a diversion program created by officials in Utah’s Cache County, allows people accused of low-level offenses to pursue education and job-training rather than being sentenced to jail time. Qualified defendants must complete a program at Bridgerland Technical College, and maintain an 80% attendance rate and a B average. Upon successful completion of the program, charges may be dismissed. Thirteen people completed the program in 2017, saving the county an estimated $50,000.

July 6, 2018

“Are we incarcerating the right number of folks for the right crimes?”

As they deal with prison overcrowding and the prospect of $500 million in prison expansions, Idaho officials are looking to Utah as a model of criminal justice reform. Utah reformed drug laws and invested in substance abuse treatment programs, and saw a decline in the prison population and the rate of crime. Idaho law currently allows a sentence of up to seven years in prison for the first-time possession of illegal drugs in any amount, and 49 percent of newly sentenced inmates in the past year were imprisoned for drug crimes.

May 25, 2018

“Without that support then we are just simply setting them up to fail.”

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill called for reforms to the state’s probation and parole systems, including offering early discharge for those who follow the program, and limiting supervision fees. James Hudspeth, the Director of Utah Adult Probation and Parole, agreed that some reforms are necessary, and cited large caseloads and a need to better prepare individuals for release.

May 25, 2018

“…The collection of revenue, and not the pursuit of justice or protecting the public, has become the driving force for civil and criminal enforcement.”

A lawsuit filed by the Institute for Justice alleges that Doraville, Georgia has turned the local justice system into a cash machine for the city’s budget. Fines, fees, and forfeitures accounted for 19 to 30 percent of Doraville’s budget over the past five years, and residents face steep fines for chipped paint, cracked concrete, and improperly stacked firewood. The practice is not limited to Georgia—fines and fees provided 30.4% of the budget in Saint Ann, Missouri, 25.6% in North Hills, New York, and 14.5% in Sunset, Utah.
 

May 18, 2018

“In 2017, the U.S. prison population dropped below 1.5 million people for the first time since 2004.”

A new report from the Vera Institute showed that the U.S. prison population fell by 19,400 in 2017, continuing an eight-year trend of similar declines. Between 2016 and 2017, Maryland and Louisiana saw the largest single year decreases in their prison populations in a decade. Both states passed Justice Reinvestment Initiatives that reduced sentences and reformed parole and probation policies.  Twenty states, including Tennessee, Utah and Kentucky saw increases in their prison population over the same time period.

December 22, 2017

“These recommendations are not about being soft on crime; they are about holding people accountable in a way that enhances public safety”

Utah’s Justice Reinvestment Initiative’s Annual Report found that reforms had reduced the projected prison population by 18% while focusing on more serious and violent offenders, held offenders accountable through community supervision, and expanded mental health and substance abuse treatments to historically high levels. Heading into the upcoming legislative sessions, Kentucky’s CJPAC Justice Reinvestment Work Group recommended 22 data-driven policy recommendations that would avert 79% of projected prison population growth and save nearly $340 million over the next ten years. The Alabama Juvenile Justice Task Force reached consensus on 48 policy recommendations to promote safety and accountability, control costs and improve outcomes.