Occupational Licensing Reform in Oklahoma, and the news in criminal justice this week

“This is a huge deal.”

Legislators in Oklahoma voted to create more specific use of criminal records in state occupational licensing decisions, and remove “good character” requirements from those laws with nearly unanimous, bipartisan support. House Bill 1373 was approved in the House by vote of 90-2 and in the Senate by a vote of 42-0, and Governor Stitt is expected to sign it into law. The Institute of Justice previously ranked Oklahoma as the 11th most burdensome state for occupational licensing, noting that 29 of 102 low-to-moderate income occupations required certification, and data from the  University of Tulsa showed Oklahomans with criminal records had an unemployment rate almost five times as high as the general population.   

“We look forward to working with leaders of both parties in the Legislature and with the administration to help us grow the economy, improve our criminal justice system and keep Pennsylvania No. 1 for second chances.” 

Pennsylvania’s business community and groups from the right and left came together to call for prioritizing justice reforms that help returning citizens find jobs in an op-ed in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Justice Action Network’s Holly Harris and leaders from the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, the ACLU of Pennsylvania, the Commonwealth Foundation and Americans for Prosperity-Pennsylvania encouraged legislators to adopt reforms to the state’s occupational licensing and probation systems, and access to expungement.

“No one should profit from criminal activity. But to take somebody’s goods and deprive them before there’s been due process delivered is an injustice.”

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed a package of bills this week that will significantly reform the state’s civil asset forfeiture procedures. House Bills 4001 and 4002 and Senate Bill 2 will require the government to notify a person that their property has been seized, return unjustified forfeited property within 14 days, delay forfeiture in cases involving controlled substances, and obtain a conviction before property can be permanently forfeited to the state in most cases. These reforms, championed by Senator Peter Lucido, follow a 2015 change to requirements for evidence and transparency, and a 2016 law that removed a bond requirement for people challenging a forfeiture.

“This report shows that judges are respecting the rights of the accused by releasing eligible pretrial defendants from jail without increasing the threat to public safety.” 

Chief Judge Timothy Evans of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, released a report this week on the effects of pretrial reforms instituted in 2017. The Cook County Jail population dropped by more than 1,600 and the average bound amount fell from $5,000 to $1,000. At the same time, violent crime in Chicago decreased by 8% and nearly 90% of those released had not been charged with a new crime during the 15-month period covered by the study. 

“This is a great opportunity for individuals to get training of a skill for employment, not in a low level or entry level type job, but one where their training and certification opens up new opportunities at a much higher level for them.”

The Culinary Academy, a partnership between the Northwest Wisconsin Workforce Investment Board, the Sawyer County Jail, Hayward Senior Resource Center, and the Sawyer County Criminal Justice Programs, provides training for incarcerated people in a variety of skills related to the culinary industry. Participants learn about food preparation, nutrition, hospitality, customer service, and menu preparation, and receive their ServSafe certification.