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Arkansas

Total Correctional Population: 72,100

Number on Parole or Probation: 51,500

Number in Local Jail or Prison: 24,000

Incarceration Rate per 100,000 residents: 800 

Incarceration Rate Rank: 6th 

Corrections Share of 2018 General Fund Expenditures: 8.5%

Sources: 

“Correctional Populations in the United States, 2016,” U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 

"2018 State Expenditure Report," National Association of State Budget Officers 

recently enacted reforms

2019

Senate Bill 308: The Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2019, establishes stronger due process protections by requiring a criminal conviction before property can be forfeited by the state.

House Bill 1523: Limits shackling of pregnant and postpartum inmates, and requires detention and correctional facilities develop standards for sufficient female hygiene products, among other changes.

NEWS

June 21, 2019

“Many states have made recidivism reduction a public safety priority, but the harsh reality is that supervision fails nearly as often as it succeeds.”

The Council of State Governments Justice Center released a report this week called “Confined and Costly,” examining how parole and probation violations contribute to state prison populations. They found that 45% of state prison admissions are due to violations of probation or parole, costing more than $9.3 billion annually. The report includes state-by-state analysis of supervision violations and budget impacts. More than half of people in prison on any given day in Idaho, Arkansas, Missouri and Wisconsin are there for a supervision violation, compared to fewer than 5% in Maryland, Michigan, Alabama and Massachusetts.

June 14, 2019

“I’m not trying to justify anything. But there is more than one way to pay for a crime, and I have overpaid for mine.”

Legislators in Maine are debating a bill that would allow courts to reduce juvenile restitution based on financial circumstances or allow some of the debt to be paid off with community service. While many states have moved to reduce or eliminate juvenile fines and fees, only six states (Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Wisconsin) and the District of Columbia place a limit on juvenile restitution obligations. These debts are not consistently collected—Connecticut recovered 87% of the amount owed, while Mississippi recovered only 28%. 

June 7, 2019

“Barriers to communication from high inmate calling rates interfere with inmates’ ability to consult with their attorneys, impede family contact that can make prisons and jails safer spaces, and foster recidivism.”
 
In Iowa, the average cost of a 15-minute call from prison or jail was $7.03, with some counties charging as much as $11. The state utility board, tasked with ensuring that reasonable rates are charged by state service providers, has asked the 11 companies who provide calling services for more information about their pricing. Iowa’s prices are $1.29 higher than the national average of $5.74, and are the 13th-highest in the country. Arkansas has the most expensive rates, charging an average of $14.49 for 15 minutes.

March 15, 2019

“This bill is a testament to finding agreement, talking through practical challenges, and raising the standard to ensure our citizens have more protections in place.”

Arkansas Senate Bill 308, which requires a criminal conviction before property can be forfeited by the state, passed unanimously in both chambers. Senator Majority Leader Bart Hester and Representative Austin McCollum championed the issue, and Governor Asa Hutchinson is expected to sign the bill into law. With his signature, Arkansas will join the ranks of states like New Mexico, Ohio, and Connecticut to dramatically restrict civil asset forfeiture. Meanwhile, in Michigan, MLive.com broke down the state police’s asset forfeiture report, detailing what was seized, how property was disposed, and how the income from assets was spent.

November 2, 2018

“Wealthy people can pay these fees and vote immediately, while poor people could spend the rest of their lives in a cycle of debt that denies them the ability to cast a ballot."

In seven states—Arkansas, Arizona, Alabama, Connecticut, Kentucky, Tennessee and Florida—people with unpaid court fines and fees are prohibited from voting. Other states require that all conditions of probation and parole, including the payment of debt, are completed prior to the restoration of voting rights. Individuals can be charged the for the use of a public defender, room and board while incarcerated, and conditions of probation and parole supervision, and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service found that nearly 10 million people owed more than $50 billion from contact with the criminal justice system.